Nutmeg Mannikin (Spice Finch)

Nutmeg Mannikin

First bird outing of the year was not bad at all. Encountered a small flock of these little seed-eaters at White Oak Bayou and was confounded as to what they were. Similar looking to female Indigo Bunting, but the bill size and shape eliminated that, plus there’s these scale-patterned black and white feathers popping out on the breast. Turns out to be the last featured bird in Sibley 2nd, the Nutmeg Mannikin or Spice Finch, another Houston area import/escapee from Asia. These are immature, as the adults have a scaled breast.

Nutmeg Mannikin

You can see on the right-hand specimen the lack of wing bar markings, good tell that these are not one of our grosbeaks. Without these photos to study I’d have never figured it out, I think. Always a thrill to find a bird that sends you into research mode.

American Robin

Also seen there, a large flock of American Robin, a strikingly beautiful bird seen up close in detail.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

And the Red-bellied Woodpecker, same time and place. A fast moving flock of Cedar Waxwing also came through. Only the second time I’d seen these, and the experience was the same: good sized flock appears out of nowhere, and disappears soon thereafter. Later at Buffalo Bayou I spend some time with a pair of Blue-headed Vireo and was unable to claim a satisfying photo.

Least Grebe

Moving on later that morning to the Houston Arboretum I saw only a single Eastern Phoebe and a Yellow-rumped Warbler, then headed to the Eastern Glades at Memorial Park to acquire another life-bird, the Least Grebe shown above. These range down through Central America with parts of Texas being the north-most boundary of its range.

Beached

Agile jeep-man plunged into the water and parked on a sandbar in the pre-dawn.

I set out early Saturday morning to camp on the beach at Bolivar Peninsula’s west end. I have converted the RAV4 into a micro-camper and wanted to give the new fixings another test run. I spent the morning in Galveston and took the ferry to Bolivar around noon.

The jeep photo was not desaturated or converted to B&W and the sky above that cloud bank was a bright grayish peach.

Sunrise on the gulf just East of the entrance to the Houston ship channel.

Black-bellied Plover
Snowy Plover
Western Sandpiper or Semi-palmated Sandpiper, I am never sure with these.

The tip of the peninsula is cordoned off for the bird sanctuary, east of this the beach is lined with camping rigs of various sorts and sizes. Ten dollar parking pass gets you a year of beach camping here, so it’s a fairly popular spot for RVs. Lots of birdlife with many wintering species staying here for the season without the burden of a ten dollar pass.

A vast winter sky holds no position in particular, but binds all within it to an inter-connectivity which teaches all things how to be.

Found this birder at the ship channel on the Galveston side before taking the ferry to Bolivar. Those are (mostly) Black Skimmers on the sandbar, wintering here by the hundreds every season.

One of the legendary Bolivar Mosquitoes. I photographed this one on the window glass after having had its fill of my bodily fluids and wishing then to escape. You’re welcome. A steady gulf breeze tends to keep them inland but that dies down at night and they will find you if you’re up and about early like I always am.

I intend to do some traveling next year, so expect more travelogue type stuff here. I will write another poem when one occurs to me and not before.

Red-tailed Hawk

Caught this red-tail picking at the body of some little critter just off the busy path at the Eastern Glades, Memorial Park, Houston, TX.

Chipping Sparrow in a small flock at Houston Arboretum, early the same day.

Snowy Egret at Brays Bayou, Houston.

Buffalo Bayou offers some nice wooded walkways right in the heart of the metropolitan bustle.

Some Houston Birds

The Brown Thrasher was having a dust bath on the trail at Houston Arboretum, the rest were found at the bayous around town. Never caught such a low angle on a Great Blue Heron before.